Five Overused Strengths (that may be perceived as weaknesses)

Poor leadership can easily frustrate well-intended employees.

As your career progresses, the same strengths that prepared you for promotion may not be the same that propel you to a level beyond that. The rules of the game change for strategic or people leadership roles. Alternatively, if you feel stalled in your current position, it may be that you’re overusing your strengths and unintentionally holding yourself back.

Here is a list of the most commonly overused strengths and how your colleagues may actually perceive you:

Your Intention: Attentive to Details

How Others Perceive You: Micromanager

As an individual contributor, you excelled at the details and consistently demonstrated your ability to be on top of everything. As a leader, demonstrating this same strength may result in frustration for those around you and set you up to underdeliver key targets. Allow your team to attend to the details and show that they are on top of their objectives, while you focus on setting the vision and leading your team to reach new heights.

Your Intention: Independent

How Others Perceive You: Unable to Build a Team

You built your reputation as an independent, steadfast, reliable emerging talent. Someone who always delivered, no matter the time constraints or challenge. Now that you lead a team and have more resources available, you’re not viewed as someone who delegates effectively or taps into the expertise of others to deliver results as a team. You often work later and longer than your direct reports and feel that the only way to do something right is to do it yourself. The harsh reality is that you’re unlikely to move to the next level of greater responsibility and a bigger team if you’re not maximizing the resources already available to you.

Your Intention: Confident

How Others Perceive You: Arrogant

The same swagger and confidence you built in your role as individual contributor is now rubbing others the wrong way. Whether in your interactions with internal colleagues or external partners, nobody enjoys working with a know-it-all. Drop the words “I” and “me” from your vocabulary. Dial back giving all the answers to ask questions of those around you. It’s possible you don’t know everything. Your team of experts wants to show you what they know and what they’re capable of, so give them a chance and see what you learn in the meantime.

Your Intention: Effective

How Others Perceive You: Lacking Composure

A swear word here, an email marked as high urgency there, a veiled threat to a vendor, and a fist pound on the conference room table has gotten needed attention in the past, raised awareness and assembled resources to work through pressing issues. Now, you’re seen as someone who struggles with maintaining composure. As a leader, you’re expected to set an example for those around you and demonstrate you can achieve results while maintaining a consistent demeanor. Being effective doesn’t mean bringing attention to yourself, it means bringing attention to the issues and demonstrating an ability to resolve them without creating unnecessary disruption.

Your Intention: Ambitious

How Others Perceive You: Pushy

Ambition was a necessary ingredient to helping you achieve promotion. Without ambition, you won’t reach those higher level positions. However, being overly ambitious may cause others to question your motives and distrust your intent. As a leader, be a people builder not a career builder, and focus on helping those around you positively achieve results and receive accolades. Know that your positive intent will be interpreted accordingly and the cream will naturally rise to the top.

For more on utilizing your strengths while leading successfully through others, be sure to check out: Even Great Leaders Have Room for Improvement and Calling “Shotgun!” Won’t Put You in the Front Seat.

– Jackie Simon

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