How to Lead Your Boss

We’ve reflected on the importance of leading your boss to improve your own effectiveness. In a nutshell, by leading your boss, you’ll find that your job gets easier and you’re showcasing your adeptness to lead, manage, take on greater responsibility and get things done.

You may now be thinking more about leading your boss and how exactly to accomplish that. Here are some suggestions:

For the boss who micromanages:

Let’s say your boss gives you lots of projects but not the space to independently manage them. Once a project has been delegated to you, you find your boss remains in the picture, sending countless emails regularly to inquire about status, jumping in to respond to people on your behalf, and completing tasks before you have a chance to address them.

For this boss, you need to build trust and confidence with her. Show that you can more than competently take the reins. When you receive the next project from your boss, set up a brief meeting to review the project purpose, your approach, timing, and the tasks you’ll own. Clearly set expectations with your boss that her help isn’t needed at this time but you’ll be sure to let her know if and when it is. Then, take the lead. If your boss begins to interfere, pop your head into her office and confidently thank her for her help while assuring her that her help isn’t needed at this time. It may take a few instances of “correcting” your boss on running interference. If after a few corrections, your boss doesn’t seem to be getting the hint, set up another one-on-one to talk openly about the challenges you’re experiencing and to see if you can come to an agreement on mutual responsibilities moving forward.

For the boss who doesn’t effectively prioritize:

It probably feels like you’re spinning your wheels at work most days. One day the direction is blue, the next it’s red, and so on. This boss clearly has difficulty making up his mind. Or, he’s dealing with the exact same kind of boss you are. Someone at the top may be constantly changing objectives, making it a larger, cultural challenge.

To start, meet with your boss as close to weekly as possible to discuss current and upcoming objectives. The key to getting ahead on this one is that you’re taking the responsibility to set up and ensure consistent meetings with your boss to focus and prioritize. Discuss and agree to the priorities, and send a meeting recap. Then, if anything changes, meet with your boss again and lead a dialogue to understand what may be driving the change in priority. The key behavior in this situation is not to gather the changes and then head back out to implement them, but to engage your boss in a discussion about why the shift in priorities occurred. Without creating a perception that you’re a roadblock to change, you’ll want to engage in dialogue to demonstrate your deeper desire to understand what’s driving the change and truly chase the highest priority projects. The next time priorities shift, meet again with your boss to try to understand the bigger picture.

This could be a great opportunity to demonstrate your strategic interest and desire to understand things at a higher level. You’ll put yourself in a better position to make recommendations instead of executing changes for change sake.

For the boss who doesn’t give helpful feedback:

Jack spent a couple of weeks on a proposal for improving quality, and when it was finally done, he clicked Send to run it up the chain. A week has gone by, so he approaches his leader, Jill, on whether she has any input, or received feedback from the executive team on the proposal. Did she even look at it yet?

A lack of feedback can apply to a project you’re working on, or your overall performance. We covered this in a previous post, but if your boss typically says, “Looks great. Everything’s great. You’re doing great. Keep doing what you’re doing.” It’s a problem.

Get in front of your boss to ask questions on performance like, “what do you see as areas of improvement,” or “If there were one area of the proposal you’d like to see built out, what would you suggest.” This approach demonstrates an interest on your part to engage in higher level thinking and to more than just execute on requests.

What’s the common theme in all of these examples? Communication. In each scenario, you’re taking the lead to open the lines of communication with your boss to understand direction and set expectations. You’re leading your boss to achieve a shared understanding of roles, responsibilities, and direction. Your boss may be too busy, or too scattered, to get there with you without your help. Thus, the reason leading your boss is important, if not critical.

I’d love to hear from you. What other situations have your run into and what approach did you use to effectively lead your boss?

 

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